buttonbush

Jul. 23rd, 2017 09:31 am
asakiyume: (glowing grass)
[personal profile] asakiyume
The Ashley reservoir is now one of my go-to places to take people when they visit. I took my old college friend and her husband there, and learned that the water-loving plant that I had thought looked very mangrove-y is buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), which grows up and down the Atlantic coast and as far inland as the Mississippi, and is indeed a species in the mangrove biome!

Buttonbush

button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

Yesterday I took [personal profile] osprey_archer there (and we read aloud to each other--so much fun), and lo and behold, the buttonbush was in bloom! I didn't have a camera, so she obliged me with a photo:

Buttonbush in flower, by [personal profile] osprey_archer



The flowers look like how pollen looks under a scanning electron microscope:

Buttonbush flowers....

buttonbush flowers

Pollen, much magnified:



(source)

Or, um... like an influenza virus...



(source)

It smells nice, though, and bees and butterflies love it. AS DO I.


July 22--Veal Puccini

Jul. 22nd, 2017 09:31 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
My sister and her husband came over for dinner this evening. She is actually one of my step-sisters, but the one I grew up with, so she feels more like an actual sister. They are somewhat reclusive, so we don't see them very often, but when we do it is always great. I should note that we are also somewhat reclusive.

It was hot, so I wanted to minimize cooking indoors. I grilled a tri-tip and some ears of corn, made some basmati rice. and a chopped salad. This is the same chopped salad I have been experimenting with. I think I have it down now.

I like to put a bit of chopped up dry salami in the salad to give it some flavor. After I made it the last time, I had a dream that I had put the salami in a kitchen drawer instead of the refrigerator drawer where I keep that kind of stuff. When I looked in the drawer today for the salami, it wasn't there. I think I actually put it in a drawer somewhere. I looked but couldn't find it.

Anyway, the dinner was delicious. We spent a couple hours eating and catching up. I always enjoy their company.

I told my sister a story about the time me and my two friends flew down to LA to attend the premier of some Rolling Stones movie. This was right around the time we graduated from high school. There was a side story about magic mushrooms that got the story started, but my favorite memory was having dinner after the movie.

After the movie we went to a swanky Italian restaurant in Century City, but the host refused to seat us. We all had long hair, wore jeans, etc., and had backpacks on. This was in 1975. We looked like hippies, I guess.

The owner came up and asked what the problem was, and the host just pointed at us, like it was obvious we didn't belong there. The owner seemed to feel differently, and seated us himself, at the best table in the restaurant. He made menu suggestions. I had the Veal Puccini, which was delicious.

After the meal, he sent out a huge fruit plate, on the house, and sat with us a while to see what brought us to Century City. We told him about flying down to see the movie, and about our somewhat aborted trip to Disneyland (that's the mushroom story). He seemed fascinated by our adventure and told us to come back any time. He also gave us a nice discount on the dinner. I never made it back, unfortunately.

I did a google search and the place is long gone, but I found a newspaper write-up from 1974, which tells me the name of the restaurant was Puccini's Seafood Grotto, and that they had eight veal dishes on the menu.

I forgot to take any pictures of our dinner or us, so all I have is the shadow of my new cherry tree on my new fence.

tree shadow

July 21--Stuck in Lodi, again

Jul. 21st, 2017 09:25 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
After doing my morning stuff I took a drive down to Lodi, which is about 20 minutes south of where I live. It used to be a sleepy farming town on the railroad line, and in many ways it still is. It is also a major wine producing region, and this has brought the town back to life.

Lodi

The old town area has been revitalized, with shops, restaurants, and wine tasting rooms. The town feels vibrant--there are viable businesses, a transit hub with a bunch of little shuttle busses heading out in all directions, and some nice street art. My town could learn a thing or two.

I wandered around for a few hours looking around and playing Ingress. Some of my compatriots built a big farm there, and I was able to get a bunch of gear. After not playing much for the past 6 months, I was pretty much out of stuff to play with. Now I have a lot. Tonight the Resistance came and destroyed that lovely farm. And so it goes.

I had a nice late lunch in a brewery/restaurant. It was satisfying. I walked a little bit more, then came home to work on my doctoral stuff for a while. My final summer report is due on Sunday.

birds

A series of sketches on a wall on a side street. One of my favorite finds today. Birds.

My step-sister and her husband are coming over for dinner tomorrow. They are somewhat reclusive, and we don't see them much, so this is a nice treat. Not sure what I am going to cook, but something that doesn't require too much heat, as it will be 102 here tomorrow.

July 20--Agatha and Edith

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:30 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
For some reason today I thought about whether I missed being a bedside nurse. I suppose I miss parts of it. I miss spending time with patients and their families, talking to them about what is going on, helping to get them through whatever it is they are getting through.

I miss using my critical care nursing skill set, which I developed over many years of practice. I could rely on my intuition and instincts, and almost always knew what to do. There is a nursing theorist who describes that process, and has written that it takes 10 years to get from novice to expert.

I don't think I could go back into the ICU again. It wouldn't be the same, and I don't think I could handle the relentless 12-hour shifts any more. I do miss it, thought. As I was writing this, I remembered the reason I thought about it. We drove past my old hospital on the way to take a walk in the rose garden and have lunch at a dim sum place in midtown.

wild rose

The rose garden was lovely as always. There were lots of people in the large park surrounding it, but very few people in the garden--mostly volunteers doing some pruning and watering. We wandered around for about a half-hour, sometimes stopping to sit on a bench and take it in.

grandfather plant

This reminded me of my grandfather's back yard. Not the grandfather I write about--the other one who died when I was fairly young--my dad's father. Our birthdays were one day apart, and when he turned 80, I turned 8. I remember him as an old man. His name was Joe.

I like the haziness of the picture. When I think of his back yard, it is hazy and somewhat desaturated in my memory, much like the image above. I could have sharpened it up, but let it be. I prefer my memories somewhat hazy.
asakiyume: (feathers on the line)
[personal profile] asakiyume
Did you ever play the authors card game? We had this when I was a kid: 13 authors--a pretty random assortment of 19th-century English and American writers, all men with the exception of Louisa May Alcott--with four works for each author. You play it like you play Go Fish, with the goal being to get as many completed sets of authors' works as possible. Wakanomori and I enjoyed playing it the other day, but I thought it would be fun to make up a set of YA fantasy works. [personal profile] osprey_archer is visiting, and we created a set. It's a fairly random assortment, only two male authors (CS Lewis and Lloyd Alexander), and two authors I follow here one LJ/DW (that would be [personal profile] sartorias and [profile] pamaladean). The authors had to have four works or series of works; we tried not to list individual works in a series, and we decided all the works should be fiction.

The original Authors game features portraits of the authors...



But we are not good at portraiture, so we used symbols for each author. [personal profile] sartorias, you're a fan! [personal profile] pameladean, you're a sprig of rosemary!

(click through to embiggen)
DSCN6425

DSCN6426

DSCN6427

DSCN6428

DSCN6429

Just now [profile] wakanomori, [personal profile] osprey_archer, and I played it. Very satisfying!

#tbt: Moar space history (pre-2006)

Jul. 20th, 2017 01:12 pm
nanila: fulla starz (lolcat: science)
[personal profile] nanila
IMG_20170720_124419_753
[Image of a Cassini spacecraft model inside a black gimbal structure comprised of three concentric rings, mounted on a plexiglass stand and sitting on the corner of a desk.]

Now that I'm back at work, I present another of my Rare Objects from Space History for #tbt. This is a model of the Cassini spacecraft, mounted in the centre of what I can only think to describe as a gimbal. The high gain antenna is pointed toward the bottom of the photo. The model was distributed to instrument teams to aid them with pointing design. It can be rotated around three axes within the gimbal. Each circle of rotation is marked in degrees, so that from a set of numbers indicating its orientation (eg "RA & dec"), an instrument engineer can work out which way the spacecraft is pointing.

I have no idea when it was originally given to our team but it predates me joining the Cassini project (ca 2006).

July 19--Getting ready

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:12 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
As I was sitting in the bathroom this morning, thinking, I noticed a very small spider, not much bigger than an ant, had let itself down on a strand of web from the ceiling, and stopped at eye level with me, just a few inches away. We watched each other for a bit. Eventually it started climbing back up toward the ceiling and I went on my way to face the rest of the day. I saw it as a good sign.

I went into work today to put some time in on the curriculum revision I am working on. I finished the revision part, and got a ways into the new content I am adding. This is for the community IV therapy course we have our students complete. I talked to my boss about it a bit, and she told me she was going to get me some funding for the hours I am putting into it. She's great like that.

I spent about 5 hours on the project, then came home and read one of my Hardy Boys books for a while. As things stand in the book, they just got arrested for mail theft and are in jail on a $50,000 bond. I can't imagine they will be able to get out of this, but there are subsequent books, so maybe.

chocko on the table

Chocko basks in the late afternoon light on the breakfast table. Don't tell Malida.

July 18--A day at the fair

Jul. 18th, 2017 08:45 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
We went to the State Fair today as planned, though without our friend, who was feeling poorly. We did all the things we normally do at the fair.

wave thing

This is one of a couple of rides here that used to belong to Michael Jackson on his Neverland Ranch. Whee.

baby pigs!

See the livestock. Check. Baby pigs!

eggplants

Visit the gardening display. Check.

Visit the vendor pavilions and buy something we don't need, Check. Actually we bought some really cool peelers, and a few more sets of the sheets we bought last year. No Ginzu knives, though.

wine slushie

We tried something new this year. It's a blackberry wine slushie. It was delicious and very refreshing after walking around in the heat all day. While we were there, I ran into one of my former students, who was also enjoying a wine slushie. I almost always run into a former student at the fair.

corn dog

Corn dog. Check. A wise man once said that if you visit the State Fair and don't have a corn dog, it's as if you never went.

foot massager

$.25 vibrating foot massager. Check.

fair picture

Photo booth pictures. Check. This year's and last year's.

It was a fun day.

witness bears

Jul. 18th, 2017 07:48 pm
asakiyume: (nevermore)
[personal profile] asakiyume
Out of the corner of my ear I was listening to a Cornell West lecture from the 1990s, and in it he said "witness bearers," but I heard "witness bears," and I know bare-bear-bear wordplay is low-hanging fruit, but here is a witness bear.

witness bear

In other news, Wakanomori and I are nearly done watching Person of Interest. I *really* have liked this show. Not every single everything--I'm not into gangster plotlines--but all the characters, intensely, and the care with which the overall story arc was handled, and the AI, free will, ends-means, creator-created stuff, very much so.

July 17--Put it on the hook, Hank

Jul. 17th, 2017 09:56 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I sat out on the back patio this morning and had coffee. I saw a red-throated hummingbird and a green-throated hummingbird, as well as a pair of doves. My attention was briefly directed at a snail crawling across the patio floor. I thought a bit about what the world would be like if snails had feet, and when I looked back, the snail was gone.

After coffee, I went in to work for about 4 hours. I have to revise our IV therapy online module. It will go live on August 10, so the clock is ticking. It used to be revised by a group from the various schools in the area, but they abandoned it last year, and I decided to rescue it rather than write an entirely new curriculum. I figured it would take hours and hours, but I was able to complete two of the four modules today, and will try to complete the other two on Wednesday.

I need to add a module dealing with intraosseous IV access, which is where you use a little drill to place an IV catheter in a bone. It's pretty cool. It will be a short module, though and shouldn't take long.

There were a few people from the program we share space with in the office today, and I got a preview of how loud it is going to be when the semester starts and there are 14-15 people in that space. I'm investing in some good headphones.

I came home and found two packages on the front patio. One was this exercise thing that Malida asked me to buy. It took me two hours to assemble. The other package was a bunch of old Hardy Boys books I ordered.

I mentioned last week that I had bid on a set of books and dropped out when the price got too high. I did another search and found a bunch of the books for sale from another seller for about $3-4 each, so I bought a bunch.

hardy boys

These books were originally written in the 1920s-1930s. The versions I read as kid were revisions that were written in the late 1950s-early 1960s. I have always wanted to read the originals.

I started one today--The Great Airport Mystery. It starts out with a drunken airmail pilot crashing his plane on the highway. Can't wait to see where it goes from there.

We are taking our recently married Thai friend to the State Fair tomorrow. Malida and I love going to the fair, and have our routine down. We start out at the fair food, then go see the livestock, the farm exhibit, and some of the art stuff. When it gets hot, we go see the indoor pavilions. We revisit the fair food and have a corn dog, then go to the pavilion where people try to sell you ginsu knives and such. I love watching those demonstrations. We always end up buying something. Last year it was bedsheets, which we love. We will be looking for them again to get a few more sets.

At the very end of the fair day, we seek out the $.25 foot massagers, then have our picture taken in the photo booth. It is supposed to only be 92 degrees tomorrow, so should be a good day.

Malida's cousin, the one who lives in Frankfurt, is on holiday and posting lovely pictures of waterfalls and things like that on Facebook. Malida made a comment on one picture in Thai language, and I hit the "translate" function to see what she said. "Put it on the hook, Hank", said the translator, completely mangling something like "that looks like a nice place to swim."
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
shoe"/

Back on this day in 1975 I was seeing the Rolling Stones at the Cow Palace. Tickets were $10.

The Red Shoes

Jul. 16th, 2017 02:47 pm
asakiyume: (Iowa Girl)
[personal profile] asakiyume
Today in church one of the altar servers was wearing red ballet-slipper-style shoes with sparkles.

red shoes

They were beautiful, and I was thinking, wow, church has come a long way since Hans Christian Andersen's time (different denomination, too, but let's sail by that issue), when the poor protagonist of "The Red Shoes" eventually HAS TO HAVE HER FEET CHOPPED OFF for the sin of indulging in vanity by wearing her red shoes to church. And then, even after she's repented and had her feet cut off, her bloody feet, dancing in the shoes, keep her from entering the church!

I have vivid memories of the illustrations accompanying this story from the version of HCA's fairy tales that we had when I was a kid--particularly the one of Karen, the protagonist, her hair a wild golden tangle, pleading with the executioner to cut off her feet. With much searching (a zillion people have illustrated HCA, including famous people like Edmund Dulac and Arthur Rackham), I found that the edition we had was called Stories from Hans Christian Andersen, illustrated by twin sisters, Anne and Janet Grahame Johnstone. They had an overly pretty, slim, stylized way of drawing people that I was fascinated by. I couldn't find the one illustration online, but I did find the one of her going into church all in white... but with the offending red shoes on. Unfortunately the person who took the photo cut off the feet (LOL), so you can't see the shoes, but you can see the glow from them:


(source)

If you click on the source link, you can get more of a sense of the illustrators' style. They had a great illustration for "The Wild Swans" of the prince who ends up still with one arm a wing, but I thought you might like this fairly hot (in an overly pretty way) picture from Tales of Greeks and Trojans:


(source)


Of a typical morning

Jul. 16th, 2017 06:04 am
a_muse_d: (rock the hula)
[personal profile] a_muse_d

Clyde

Of a typical morning




MauMau

Of a typical morning




It's interesting. Over the past year Clyde has taught MauMau that kitty interaction needn't be dire defensive/offensive hostility, the way it was with Mu Ch'i for all those years. In the above pics, they are maybe 18 inches apart; something that would absolutely never happen with Mau and Mooch. And, Clyde can romp about and lunge and retreat playfully for a little while before Mau screams and runs to her safe spot. They eat inches apart. She's now, for the first time ever, head butting against me. I never saw that this transformation was possible. It makes life much more pleasant for all of us.


I was eating wings yesterday afternoon while watching a Mariners game at home and bit down wrong and cracked off part of my front tooth. Good god. My smile will now be closed until something can be done about it.


I spoke to Larry on the phone last night. He has a friend with a medical card, and Thursday will be getting something to help with discomfort and appetite. He knows things are winding down. No illusions about it. Me? I keep thinking that things will improve with treatment and allow him several more years. This is not going to happen, as I realized last night with our parting words. We always say, talk to you soon, love you, bye. Last night he paused and said, I love you very much. I hung up the phone and sobbed. My sis called shortly after and we had a comforting conversation. She is well versed with impending loss and coming to terms with it, and the aftermath.



I picked up the guitar yesterday afternoon for the first time in over four months. I've got the bug to learn the Go Go's song, Our Lips Are Sealed. Learn it good and smooth and sweet, and play it for the boys and have them join in if we ever play music together again. It's been that four months long.


I keep thinking I am going to get better at life, but I never do.


I guess that's alright, in the end.

July 15--Walking, not running

Jul. 15th, 2017 10:06 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
We made some plans to take Malida's friend to the the state fair next week. She is the one who got married a few months ago. Her new husband is a pilot, and is gone for a few days each week. She doesn't drive yet, so she pretty much sits at home. Anyway, we thought the fair would be fun for her. She will spend the night at our house as well, and then she and Malida will do some shopping.

I like going to the fair. I have been going to it, on and off, since I moved up to Sacramento, where the fair is held. My first fair visit was 32 years ago, in 1985. It was during one of the low points in my life. I remember wandering around feeling somewhat morose, until I walked into a greenhouse with all these beautiful flowers. I sat there for a few minutes, and had a sort of epiphany that maybe my life wasn't over after all, one of a few epiphanies I had during that time. A few months later I would turn 29, and go down and sign up for the initial classes that would lead to my initial nursing degree. I always think of that moment in the flower hothouse when I am at the fair. That and a corn dog.

We walked along the creek trail this morning before it got too hot. We saw all our turtle and bird friends, as well as some friendly dogs and people. After we walked to we went to the gyro/kabob place and had some gyros.

walk

I took a nap this afternoon, but was awakened by Malida yelling something from another room, which she likes to do. When I opened my eyes, I found that she was still taking her nap, and I realized that it was her yelling at me in a dream that woke me up. It seemed somewhat unfair.

In the afternoon I did some work for work. I have some curriculum to update, and it has to be done by August 10, when we open our course site. I also have to update the course site. So I will spend some more time on that next week.

shrimp roll

I made some shrimp rolls with homemade dill pickles for dinner. I have never made pickles, and was kind of surprised by how easy it is. I remember my babysitter making them in the summer from cucumbers she grew in her garden in the back yard. It seemed like a big deal back then, but maybe because she was putting them in jars and doing all that that entails.

My babysitter's name was Bernice. She cared for me from when I was about 2 until I was about 12 or 13 and didn't require a babysitter any more. She was like a second mother to me, and I have fond memories of those times. She always had a big garden because they didn't have much money, and the food they grew was what they ate. I could (and probably will) write an entire entry or two about those times.

Tomorrow is supposed to be 106 degrees here. We are planning our day accordingly.

July 14--Spellbound

Jul. 14th, 2017 10:56 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I got up early this morning to do some cooking for Malida's work potluck today. It was kind of warm yesterday evening, and I didn't want the house to heat up any more than it was, so I opted for this morning instead. I made a macaroni and cheese casserole, which is a big favorite with her work peeps. It's a recipe I have been making since I first learned to cook. It has evolved a bit over time, but is essentially the same recipe that my grandma showed me.

After I finished cooking, I took the food to Malida's workplace, which is about 15 minutes from our house. I dropped off the food and then played Ingress for a while. It was good to make some green triangles.

case tractor

This sits next to a portal known as "Antique McCormick Tractor", which is an antique McCormick tractor. This, however, is an antique Case steam tractor, circa 1899. There is a yard full of these things just beyond where the city ends and it turns to a rural area.

Yesterday I had a nice phone conference with my doctoral advisor. She was happy with my progress. I have to keep reminding myself that my ultimate goal is not to please her, but to complete the project and graduate.

I have about a month left of summer break before I return to work. I have a lot to do in that time, both with my project and with work stuff. One week of that time will be a driving vacation in Oregon, which I am looking forward to.

cactus flower

A cactus flower near the rusting tractors.

shy like a pigeon

Jul. 14th, 2017 10:18 am
asakiyume: (miroku)
[personal profile] asakiyume
Eve Shi introduce me to this great phrase, shy like a pigeon. It means someone who seems gregarious, but flies off if you get too close. I really understand that! I can be really sociable so long as there's a certain distance built in, like with .... drumroll .... social media!1 Specifically, the sort of interaction that you can get on LJ/DW. You can share all sorts of thoughts, chat, enthuse about whatever it is you want to enthuse about, even give or receive comfort and consolation--but you can also retreat, and by and large people won't mind too much. It reminds me of something [personal profile] sovay said about a writer's characterization, that his characters were "on the whole are drawn more vividly than deeply." It's that type of friendship, vivid but not deep.

Of course you can *make* it deep. I bet anyone who's been online for more than a few years has had serious, lasting friendships blossom from their online interactions. I know several people who've gotten married to people they met online. But when it gets deep, most probably you're no longer interacting solely through LJ/DW. Probably you're meeting up in person, sending private messages or emails, maybe exchanging paper letters, maybe phoning--you're getting to know the person through more than one medium.

But once a friendship is a deep one, you can't convert it back into a shallow one. You can drift apart as friends--that happens--but you'll never not have shared a deep friendship. And if you have a social-media space made up of people who are mainly close friends, that's very different from a social-media space made up of strangers and acquaintances. Speaking for myself (but I'm willing to bet this is true for many people), it changes how you interact. You have responsibilities in a way you don't if you're interacting with strangers and acquaintances.

Musing on the nature of online interactions and in-the-flesh interactions, and what friendship is, etc. etc., has gradually led me to the conclusion that I haven't been a very good real-life friend to very many people. I **haven't** done that thing that gets talked about in every movie and every essay on friendship: I haven't been there as a supportive presence for people in hard times. Not very much. Part of me wants to say that it took my mother dying, and having to be there for my dad, for me to understand what being there for someone really means. Kind of late in life to learn that stuff.

But I'm trying harder now. Still in a very limited way, because, see above, shy like a pigeon. (Or maybe I shouldn't blame shyness. Maybe it's just selfishness.)

I thought I might segue into talking about how being in a social-media space composed of actual friends lends itself to certain types of posts and inhibits others, but as I think about it more, I think a lot of that comes down to personal styles--it's actually hard to generalize on. Maybe what I could talk about would be my own feelings on that--but another time.


1And not just social media. Acquaintanceship through some shared activity can be like this; my interactions with people in my book group feels similar. Warm, friendly, but not too deep.

July 13--Wibbly Wobbly

Jul. 14th, 2017 12:46 am
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
hibiscus

Hi Biscus!

July 12--Surprised to learn

Jul. 12th, 2017 10:45 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I woke up fairly early in anticipation of my phone conference with a researcher who had done work in the Hmong Community here in my area. I re-read the articles she had co-written with a number of other researchers and formulated some questions I wanted to ask. I completely forgot to have a cup of coffee, until it was almost time for the call. Fortunately, I was able to fit that.

I spoke to her for close to an hour. She was gracious with both her time and her knowledge. She was able to provide me some valuable contacts in the Hmong community, and offered to share a bunch of educational material in Hmong that they had developed. More valuable were her insights into the community and how to reach the people I need to reach. She understood my project, and gave me some valuable practical advice.

I have a phone meeting with my advisor tomorrow. I will need to show her that I have made progress with my project. I have, but hope I am able to adequately describe that progress to her.

After I spoke to the researcher, I went out and took a walk in the park. I felt good, and was happy to be outside. I took a selfie to send to Malida. I like it, thought my eyes are half closed.

me

After I got home I spent some more time researching out on the patio on my laptop. It was a lovely day. The landscaper came by and we talked about some adjustments to the watering system, which he will do tomorrow.

daylily

The daylily seems to be doing well.

July 11--Loan me a dime

Jul. 11th, 2017 09:57 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I woke up to another sunny day, which is pretty normal for the summer. If I had woken up to anything else it would have been remarkable. The forecast for today said it would be warm, but that the temps would remain below 100, which is fine with me.

I got up and watered the plants in the back yard. I had made coffee for Malida before she left for work early, but by the time I thought about having a cup it was already cold, and I wanted to get out and walk before it got hot.

I took my usual walk in the park. Lots of people out walking again this morning. I saw one guy who looked to be about 10 years older than me jogging. My knees said, "no way man".

handprints

Some hand prints on the side of a storage locker at one of the baseball diamonds. The way the light hit it, it made me think of someone on the other side of a window, trying to get out.

I listened to music while I walked--The Loft, which is my favorite satellite radio station. The DJ who was spinning has been a DJ for years and years. I love hearing her tell stories about her experiences over the years.

I came home and did some work towards my doctoral project. I have a phone interview in the morning with a woman I have been trying to track down for a while, who did some work with diabetes in the Hmong community a few years ago, and is now focusing on cancer in the same community. I'm hoping she can give me some contacts in the community.

Being an introverted person, having to reach out to people I don't know is probably the most difficult aspect of this project. I hate doing it, but if the project is to succeed, I have to. And I have to be persistent about it. I'm trying.

I had some lunch and sat down in my easy chair and read a novel for a few uninterrupted hours. I read close to 200 pages. Reading for pleasure--such a luxury.

I mentioned that the book is somewhat dated. It was written in 1969. If the protagonist is out and about, he has to find a phone booth to make a call, and has to have a pocket full of change to do it, or at least a dime. If he is expecting a call, he has to hang around the office, or tell someone where he can be reached. Need some important papers in New York? Get on the redeye and fly there. No fax machines, no FedEx. Get there and find that someone swiped the papers out from underneath you? Find another phone booth to call with the bad news.

All the women are two-dimensional sex symbols, at least from the perspective of the protagonist. And everyone smokes, even in doctor offices. Oh, and three-martini lunches. No wonder the protagonist gets lost in thought so often. A captivating story, nevertheless.

zyzyly

Zyzyly!

Years ago, before Boz Scaggs was a smooth operator, he recorded his second album with a bunch of session musicians. One of the songs was a blues number that ran close to 13 minutes. The session guitarist for that track was Duane Allman.

July 10--Prof. Panglos and Rabbit

Jul. 10th, 2017 10:28 pm
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I wanted to get out and take a walk before it got too hot, and I did. I went over to the park and walked the cycle. There were plenty of other people who had the same idea. It was supposed to be just under 100 today (and it was), which was cooler than the past few days, but still kind of hot.

After my walk I went to the big hardware store/nursery and got a couple bags of mulch and a few other things. I will put the mulch in the garden tomorrow. I bought some marigolds to plant near the tomatoes. I'm still thinking about the ultimate fate of the fountain, and have some ideas, but haven't acted on them.

I went to the store and bought some things. I had an idea about making some mini-burgers. I found some interesting cheddar cheese with roasted onions in it and some beer-based mustard from the brewery up the road in Chico.

I came home and fixed the burgers. I sautéed some onions and mushrooms and grilled the burgers. I prepared some mini-buns with the mustard. I added the cheese to the burger. I thought about taking a picture, but didn't. They were amazing! The various flavors fit together perfectly. I jotted down some notes so I could remember how I made them.

After lunch I did a bit of doctoral work. I had a few people respond to my requests for information, and made a couple of phone appointments for later in the week. My advisor sent me an article.

I started reading an old novel I had read years ago called The Seven Minutes. It has to do with censorship. Some of the situations and attitudes are horribly dated (think early 70s), but the author's thoughts on freedom of speech are still very relevant.

I had a nice nap, after which I got up and did some house chores. I read the book some more, and now I am here making this journal entry while Malida watches a Korean soap opera.

mural

A new piece of art on the maintenance shed at the park. I like it.

I learned today that there is an entire book written about Jethro Tull's album Thick as a Brick, and that there are a few paragraphs that analyze "Prof. Panglos and Rabbit", which was a comic on the album cover. We are geared toward the average rather than the exceptional.

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